postpartum-blues-how-to-survive-the-first-six-weeks

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Did you ever rewind and think about the period when you were 38 weeks pregnant? That’s when you were ready to bring into this world the 7-pound wonder that you had been nurturing within you.  You would have thought that the worst part of it is over and now you get to relax and bring some normalcy in your life. The bloated figure that was you are just a memory now.

However, postpartum life is definitely an eye-opener to so many changes, especially as a first-time mom. You have your hands full, trying so hard to get your little one get used to his or her new life. Sometimes, you forget thinking about yourself and neglect your well-being. If that’s not enough, you have a stream of visitors (they mean well) who want to dote over your baby and congratulate you. There’s hardly any time or inclination and you begin to put yourself at the bottom of the food chain to ensure that everyone else is happy first.

Here are some tips that’ll help you through your postpartum blues:

Coping with what’s happened to your body

It’s not just about your waistline, the body changes and there are the stretch marks that begin to darken. Looking at all this you might feel that the bump you had before delivery looked a lot cuter. Your taut belly was stretched beyond imagination during the past nine months while your baby was inside. Now that he or she is out, the skin that was stretched out so much is slowly getting back its elasticity and bounce. To make matters worse, your abdominal muscles are all out of place and your uterus is still getting back to its original shape and size.

The best advice is to avoid trying to slip into your old pair of skinny jeans right away to avoid any disappointment. The only solace is that it’s not just you, every new mom feels that way. The good news is that time and effort will help you regain your old shape and size; with a few tell-tale stretch marks left behind as a legacy (we call the “Earned Tiger Stripes). Now is the time you should be celebrating your newly gained status of motherhood and stop worrying about how your body looks and feels. Just put on those comfy pants or yoga pants and a belly tightener around your waist and continue on with your day. Your body needs time. You still need to be wearing the loose-fitting maternity tops so that you can feed your baby the moment he or she bawls for milk. Of course, you may want to try the convenient breast pump, which will help you have the next baby-feed ready, with the good properties quite intact.

Don’t miss out on the nutrition

A new mom needs to not just take care of her baby; she needs to take care of herself too. Whether you are breastfeeding or pumping the milk to feed your little one, you still need to have 350 to 500 calories extra each day. You need to make sure these are good calories that don’t come from sugary foods and beverages. While such foods give you instant energy that you need badly, they are not good for nourishing your body.

What you need to do is go on a well-balanced diet that contains plenty of fruits and vegetables, along with whole grains and protein. Try to remain hydrated by drinking at least 6 to 8 glasses of water per day, in addition to fresh fruit juices and low-fat milk. Dairy is probably the best source of calcium yet. Try eating fish at least twice a week, which will give the precious DHA your baby requires. Else, you may want to try MAMANURTURE that contains DHA and prenatal vitamins, which are so essential for your body at this stage.

Don’t be too concerned about the weight that you will be putting on. It is bound to reduce slowly as you will be breastfeeding your baby continuously during this crucial period. After all, your pregnancy lasted nine months; you need to give at least that much time for things to get back to normal.

You might suffer from post-partum constipation like most other new-moms. If all the high-fiber fruits and vegetables don’t seem to help, do consult your doctor who’ll probably prescribe a stool-softener that’ll make life a lot more bearable. Remember that prolonged constipation can lead to hemorrhoids, but don’t take any laxatives without your doctor’s advice. The bowel movements normally get back to normal after some time as your hormones start going back to normal levels.

Don’t be in a hurry to workout

Don’t listen to friends or get swayed by the way celebrity moms look. Your body is still going through a recovery process and starting an exercise regimen too early can do more harm than good. Any pressure on the pelvic area now can lead to pain or even a vaginal tear. Start with mild exercises like walking before graduating to more strenuous exercises. It is good to take advice from your therapist or midwife who might even suggest you work on Kegel exercises before you do anything else as they help with perineal healing and better bladder control.

Bonding with the baby

It is important to bond with your baby who has just come into this world. Your baby was inside you all along and is used to your smell and can recognize your voice. Talk to your baby (sweet nothings) and pet and cuddle him or her as much as you can. Talk to your baby and read loud and always respond quickly whenever your baby cries. Whenever you walked around when your baby was inside he or she was being rocked gently. Your baby is probably missing the warmth and cushioning enjoyed while inside. Try to make it up by cuddling and coddling your baby, which gives all the reassurance. In case you are suffering from postpartum depression try to get professional help as this condition will directly affect your baby and come in the way of your bonding with the little one.

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